Disaster Planning for Pets

Disaster Planning for Pets

With September being National Preparedness Month, it’s a good time to remember that disasters, like hurricanes and wildfires, can happen at any moment with little to no notice. It can be difficult to remember what you need as you evacuate, especially when you have a furry friend, so planning in advance is key! Dr. V hosted a live video stream to share some essential planning tips for pet parents. Read on for a recap or watch the video above!


Check ID Tags

  • Make sure your pet’s ID tags are up to date as addresses and phone numbers change.
  • Check with your dog’s and cat's microchip manufacturer to ensure they have updated contact info.


Updated Contact List

  • Double check that you have important numbers, like your vet’s number, saved for emergencies.
  • Shelters may require paperwork, like proof of vaccination, so be sure to put important documents onto a smartphone app for easy access.
  • As a backup, make paper copies of records for when you don’t have access to your digital copies.


Get Connected on Social

  • There are many social network groups that are local to your town or neighborhood. Join in advance to keep in touch with the community! Dr. V. told us about her experience of hearing from a neighbor that her neighborhood was on the news because of an evacuation order. Thanks to her network, she was able to get her pets out safely and quickly.
  • Apps like NextDoor and local Facebook groups can be great resources to stay up to date on local news, updates, and evacuations.


Make a “Go Bag”

  • With little time to prepare in the midst of disaster, making a go bag for your pets in advance is essential for a quick evacuation.
  • Always have a week’s worth of dog food, cat food and water for them.
  • Continuously rotate bags of food as you receive them so you are not left with an expired bag.
  • Rotate your pet’s water supply every six months.
  • Don’t forget dog treats and cat treats to help keep your pets occupied in stressful situations.
  • Include your pet’s carrier, bowls, leashes, and toys.


Pro-tip: Always keep your carrier empty so you don’t spend valuable time unloading any items to make way for your cat.

It is crucial that you prepare for emergencies before they happen. To watch Dr. V’s entire live stream for more details and her own harrowing story, watch the video above. Stay safe everyone!

Comments (2) -

  • Mary Vidmar

    10/2/2020 9:48:53 AM |

    One thing not mentioned to put in your "go" bag is medications for your pet.  Wondering if there is a need to get extra meds from the vet or pharm supplier.  How should this work? My dog is on several meds.  

  • Kim

    10/2/2020 9:37:18 PM |

    Great video and info. What kind of carrier is best for cats in disaster scenario??

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