June 2012
One of the endearing qualities of companion animals is a complete lack of awareness about social norms. If they’re hungry, they eat. If they have an itch, they scratch. And, if they have gas, they … well, they release it. No doubt, gassiness is a subject that can spark the giggles. A comic staple of popular films, whether you euphemistically refer to it as breaking wind, cutting the cheese, barking spiders, a case of the vapors, churchhouse creepers, low flying geese, smoofers, whootzies, silent but violents, talky shorts, paint peelers, caboose rumblers, intestinnabulation, drive by pootings, smurf killers, lighting the afterburners, under-thunder, one-gun salutes or disturbances in the force, excessive gassiness is just another issue pet parents have to tolerate … or do they?" />

Dealing with Gassy Pets

Wink

One of the endearing qualities of companion animals is a complete lack of awareness about social norms. If they’re hungry, they eat. If they have an itch, they scratch. And, if they have gas, they … well, they release it. No doubt, gassiness is a subject that can spark the giggles. A comic staple of popular films, whether you euphemistically refer to it as breaking wind, cutting the cheese, barking spiders, a case of the vapors, churchhouse creepers, low flying geese, smoofers, whootzies, silent but violents, talky shorts, paint peelers, caboose rumblers, intestinnabulation, drive by pootings, smurf killers, lighting the afterburners, under-thunder, one-gun salutes or disturbances in the force, excessive gassiness is just another issue pet parents have to tolerate … or do they?

Let’s look at the causes. Excess gas in canine and feline intestinal tracts can be a function of normal biological processes, but repeated episodes may signal that something is out of whack. While cats do experience episodes, this is a much more common complaint for pet parents of canines than felines (cat lovers, you may now feel appropriately smug). Dogs who eat too quickly can swallow a lot of air along with their food; if it isn’t burped out, gas will find an exit path on the other end. Large meals, especially those eaten rapidly, and a radical change in diet can both lead to poor digestion, resulting in excessive gas. More...

Welcome to the next installment of our Successful Aging Series! In this episode of Pet Talk, we’ll discuss issues that effect many creatures as they age – maintaining strength and mobility. Watch as Dr. Sarah dispenses her valuable veterinary insights about nutrition, weight control, and the importance of strength training for the preservation of healthy bones and muscles. If your dog or cat exhibits gimpiness, or just isn’t as lively as in younger years, you’ll be especially interested in learning about what options are available to you to make a positive difference in their lives, now and long into the future. Our good doctor explains how pain may be at the root of some problems, while in other cases diet may be responsible for a hitch in the get-along. Additionally, we’ll reveal some simple exercises you can do with your companion animal to make them feel better and age with grace. Be sure to share this important health message with your friends and family!" />

Successful Aging - Maintaining Strength and Mobility

Welcome to the next installment of our Successful Aging Series! In this episode of Pet Talk, we’ll discuss issues that effect many creatures as they age – maintaining strength and mobility. Watch as Dr. Sarah dispenses her valuable veterinary insights about nutrition, weight control, and the importance of strength training for the preservation of healthy bones and muscles. If your dog or cat exhibits gimpiness, or just isn’t as lively as in younger years, you’ll be especially interested in learning about what options are available to you to make a positive difference in their lives, now and long into the future. Our good doctor explains how pain may be at the root of some problems, while in other cases diet may be responsible for a hitch in the get-along. Additionally, we’ll reveal some simple exercises you can do with your companion animal to make them feel better and age with grace. Be sure to share this important health message with your friends and family!

(Consult your veterinarian before starting an exercise program with your companion animal.)

Going Home Greyhounds

 

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Trent Henry

The noted aviator and writer Antoine de Sainte-Exupery once said, “In giving you are throwing a bridge across the chasm of your solitude”. In that sense, this month’s featured rescue organization has firmly established itself as a builder of bridges, connecting thousands of dogs and adoptive pet parents.

It’s our great honor to announce our financial award to Going Home Greyhounds, a non-profit that provides refuge, aid and care for retired racers. Based in Wexford, PA, this rescue has been in continuous operation since 1995 and their reach covers a 100-mile radius which encompasses Pittsburgh. Going Home Greyhounds (GHG) is guided by a board of five members who oversee the day-to-day operations of more than 70 volunteers. This massive team is responsible for a variety of duties, including transporting retired racers from track kennels, bathing newly retired dogs, fostering Greyhounds in their homes, doing meet-and-greets with people interested in adoption, participating in local parades and handling the details of fundraising events.
Every fosterer in their network commits significant time and energy to locating qualified and loving homes for these graceful creatures. Caretakers are actively involved in making sure the adoption process operates smoothly. As a “temporary parent”, they can provide valuable insights into the personalities and individual needs of every dog, helping to place the right Greyhound with the right family. More...