Foundation Award to SW Collie Rescue

Shasta

More good news from our non-profit charity, The Dr. Jane Foundation. This month, we’re excited to reveal another financial award, this time to an amazing group of rescuers based in New Mexico. A breed-specific rescue group, this organization places abandoned collies and Shetland sheepdogs with foster homes until appropriate adoptive families can be located.

Founded in 2001, the rescue has grown to handle incoming dogs from New Mexico, Texas and Arizona. Thanks to the working relationships they’ve cultivated with other shelters and rescue groups in this tri-state area, they are able to locate and save dogs according to their breed-specific mission. For example, last year when a massive hoarding situation was uncovered by law enforcement in Tomball, TX, SW Collie Rescue helped with the intake (147 collies were saved).

Completely staffed by volunteers, the daily operations are overseen by regional coordinators based on the goals laid out by the Board of Directors.

In the early years, they rescued approximately 25 dogs per year. That number has more than tripled. To date, they have rescued well over 700 collies and shelties!

Upon intake, every dog receives a wellness exam, inoculations, immediate treatment of wounds and illnesses, and much more. As soon as a pup enters their system, they can rest assured that they will be taken care of.

Healthy dogs usually spend less than a month in foster care, as SWCR works diligently to place adoptables in loving homes. As you will soon see, unfortunately not all of their dogs are healthy when they are saved.

While behavioral issues with these breeds are rare, some come from backgrounds where little to no socialization has taken place. Or, worse,from an abusive situation. Thanks to a committed network of experienced collie and sheltie foster parents, every dog finds himself in an environment of love, patience and training. It’s all part of the package, readying these creatures for their eventual adoption. If any behavioral issues are noted, the expertise of an animal behaviorist is employed. No pup will leave foster care before they are ready to join a loving household.

SW Collie Rescue used their financial award to help cover the costs of veterinary care for three of their dogs who had urgent needs. Given the quality of their care, and their outstanding dedication to their cause, the Board’s choice to fund their application was an easy decision.

The grant from The Dr. Jane Foundation made it possible for SWCR to diagnose and treat two very sick collies, Shasta and Cassidy. The remaining funds helped restore to full health a third pup, named Faith, who nearly died from starvation.

Shasta
Shasta

Shasta, age 7 or 8, was found as a stray in the desert outside El Paso, TX. She was covered with ticks. Her filthy, matted coat hung like dreadlocks from her emaciated body. She also had large mammary tumors, one the size of a grapefruit and weeping clear fluid.

She underwent successful surgeries for three of these tumors in New Mexico. After her recovery, she was driven to Phoenix, AZ to be fostered by a family interested in adopting her. There, a fourth tumor grew quickly. Not all of it could be surgically excised and complications ensued. But the tumor was benign, so her caretakers are hopeful that this sweet, beautiful girl will recover fully.

Cassidy
Cassidy

Cassidy, age 5, was one of collies rescued last year from the hoarder in Tomball, TX. She had given birth to many litters in unspeakably squalid conditions. Once rescued, she was treated for hookworms and spayed. She seemed healthy and soon became a happy, loving house dog at her foster home near Albuquerque, NM.

A month later, Cassidy suddenly stopped eating and was in such pain that she could barely move. She had a fever, swollen joints, a high white blood cell count and a low platelet count. It was clear to everyone, Cassidy was going downhill fast. Caretakers rushed her to an internal medicine specialist, who ran more tests and diagnosed her with immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA), an autoimmune disease.

Cassidy improved immediately and went home, but every time her drug dosage was reduced she would relapse. Then, four months later, she was overwhelmed with even more problems, causing another rush to the specialist and yet another close call.

She now is suspected of having systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a condition in which multiple inflammatory pathways are activated, causing a widespread attack by the different parts of the immune system against its own cells and tissues. Since SIRS can be fatal, managing it requires constant attention to symptoms and skillful balancing of drugs and dosages. Cassidy’s foster mom, who loves her dearly, provides the attention this poor creature requires. They remain hopeful that they can provide the care needed for Cassidy to continue her journey of healing.

Faith
Faith Before After

Faith, age 2, was spotted lying motionless in the desert outside Las Cruces, NM. But she was still alive, though dehydrated and nearly starved to death. When she was taken to the local shelter, she was too weak to eat or stand. Shelter workers there took good care of her and contacted SWCR, asking if it would be possible to accept her into foster care.

Most of Faith's coat had fallen out, so it was difficult to discern her breed. But it didn’t matter. After one look, SWCR volunteers could not refuse this sweet, timid girl, who had cheated death and suffered so greatly.

Thanks to excellent vet care, good food and dietary supplements, Faith soon was taking walks, playing with the cat at her foster home, and running with energy and confidence. Weeks later, she has made a full recovery and now is ready to be adopted by a forever family.

All of this care and hard work was in part made possible by our generous donation to this small New Mexico rescue. Vice President of the organization Lee More said of the award, “We are so grateful that The Dr. Jane Foundation was able to help our neediest collies.”
Anyone looking for more information about this incredible rescue, or the dogs currently available for adoption, can visit their site at nmcollierescue.com.

From all of us here at Life’s Abundance headquarters, we thank this committed network of lifesavers for their incredible work. And we thank all readers and customers … through your personal donations and continued patronage, you’ve helped make all of our grants possible. Your generosity and loyalty have helped to make the world a better place for abandoned, abused and neglected animals across America.

And there’s more good news … we are still accepting applications for funding. If you know of an animal rescue organization that deserves special recognition and financial support, please encourage them to fill out an application. Download here.

Check back next month for more good news from The Dr. Jane Foundation. Together, we’re making a difference!

Comments (6) -

  • JoAnne Rando-Moon

    4/30/2015 3:02:00 AM |

    I LOVE knowing that feeding my pets Life's Abundance helps other, less fortunate animals get the care and love they need to find their forever homes.  Thank you Dr. Jane Foundation!

  • Rebecca Forrest

    4/30/2015 9:00:41 AM |

    Look at the great work this rescue group is doing! And look at what every one of the purchases through Life’s Abundance helps to support!

    Virgil and I are very proud to be associated with a company that takes rescue so seriously!

    Thanks, Dr Jane Foundation!

  • Maria

    4/30/2015 3:30:00 PM |

    Thank you for supporting this rescue. We adopted our collie from them 3+ years ago, and we occasionally drive dogs and participate in fund-raising events. Wonderful group of people and beautiful breed!

  • Megan Smith

    5/5/2015 1:22:41 AM |

    I have always admired the noble beauty of this breed.  Congratulations to this rescue for helping those in need, and thank you to the Dr. Jane Foundation for your support.

  • Stacey

    5/5/2015 3:33:26 AM |

    Wonderful article.  I was touched by the before and after shots.  Those babies are precious!  Congrats

  • Jose Gibert

    5/16/2015 3:09:12 PM |

    I am glad that somebody is taking good care of those collies they are very good dogs I have 3 before my last one died 2 years ago and I still missing him I now have 4 shelties two were adopted I wish I can have another collie but I know that will be to much for
    my wife and I since we are on ours late and mid 70's.
    Keep the good job SW collie rescue.

    Jose

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