Life's Abundance | Makers of premium health products for dogs, cats and pet parents, too!

Pet Product Recalls Skyrocket in 2018

recall-alert

Updated 3-22-18: Something is very wrong in America’s food safety apparatus. Recently, numerous pet food companies have issued recalls for products containing Salmonella, Listeria and even Pentobarbital, a drug used almost exclusively to euthanize dogs, cats and horses. Not only can these contaminants result in pets contracting a serious illness, possibly even a fatal one, but in some cases they can lead to serious harm for anyone improperly handling the tainted products.

So far in 2018, we've seen double the number of recalls vs. 2017 in just two months time. Here's a snapshot of the FDA's pet product recall page ...

snapshot-recalls

What jumps out from the list of recalls is the high number of raw foods which have become increasingly popular in the last couple of years, not only in the US, but around the world. Unfortunately, by their very nature, raw foods carry an exceptionally high risk of bacterial contamination.

THE DANGERS OF RAW FOODS

In fact, a recent study published in the British Medical Journal by a team of veterinary scientists from The Netherlands cited the dangers associated with feeding raw foods to companion animals. In a broad sampling of raw-food products, investigators found a startling amount of bacteria and parasite contamination. Numerous products contained Salmonella, Listeria, E coli, Toxoplasma gondii or other harmful contaminants that not only pose risks to dogs and cats, but also to the pet parents serving the foods. In the study's summation, researchers did not hold back in their conclusions, saying, "Cats and dogs that eat raw meat diets are also more likely to become infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria than animals on conventional diets, which could pose a serious risk to both animal health and public health."

One company has initiated four recalls since 2016 after receiving multiple complaints from consumers. The FDA and the State of Washington are conducting separate investigations, due to the repeat nature of contaminants and the number of consumers affected. A number of dogs have been gravely sickened and one cat has died as a result of eating these products.

Another company has recalled its frozen raw pet food after reports surfaced of the death of two kittens from Salmonella septicemia, also referred to as blood poisoning. The FDA has launched an investigation, which has already uncovered the presence of both Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes in samples of that company's Beef products.

And these are just two of the raw food producers that have issued recalls. The products recalled are too numerous to include in this post, but we encourage readers to visit the FDA site for full details (link provided below).

EUTHANASIA DRUG DISCOVERED IN CANNED DOG FOOD

On February 8th, ABC 7 News (a D.C. affiliate) published a story about their investigation of the actual ingredients in dozens of canned dog food brands. What they found was genuinely disturbing. In all, 31 different foods tested positive for Pentobarbital. Most of the foods were produced by one company, The J.M. Smucker Co. The company first denied the reports, then issued a "withdrawal notice" asking retailers to return defective products. The FDA launched an investigation and the company finally issued a recall. 

Smuckers-recall-one

Smuckers-recall-two

Consumption of a pentobarbital-laced food can cause dogs to suffer drowsiness, dizziness, excitement, loss of balance, nausea, inability to stand, nystagmus (jerking movement of the eyes), even coma or death. Needless to say, if you believe your pet is suffering from such problems, please contact your veterinarian right away.

A Class Action lawsuit has been brought against Big Heart Brands, a subsidiary of Smuckers. To learn more about the Class Action, visit the link provided in the citations below, especially if your dog has consumed any of the recalled products.

If you're looking for a brand that puts the needs and wellbeing of companion animals before profits, we invite to you check out our health-promoting line of products for dogs and cats. We don't sell anything we wouldn't feed our own pets, who we treat like family. We only work with thoroughly vetted and trusted manufacturers and suppliers who provide top-notch ingredients. Our pet foods are made in small, frequent batches and go directly to our five warehouses where they are carefully boxed and shipped to customers. We've never had a recall, but we have a procedure in place that would allow us to contact every single consumer of our products directly (either by phone or by email) if there's an issue. At Life’s Abundance, we not only make premium products but we also ensure that we deliver premium products.

March 19, 2018: With all of the additional regulations put in place over the last ten years, pet food safety is still a problem. According to a follow-up story on March 19 by ABC7, they were able to purchase cans of dog food recalled due to pentobarbital contamination.

Citations Worth Checking Out:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180111224018.htm

http://wjla.com/features/7-on-your-side/class-action-suit-filed-against-dog-food-manufacturer-after-7-on-your-side-investigation

https://www.petfoodindustry.com/articles/6990-fda-investigates-arrow-reliance-raw-pet-food?v=preview

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2018/03/blue-ridge-beef-recalls-pet-food-kittens-deaths-reported/#.Wp7lXujwa70

https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth/RecallsWithdrawals/default.htm

About That New Puppy

Blonde-Lab

Few things in life are quite as joyous as finding a new puppy to bring home. First come the aww-inspiring introductions, the wobbly walk, the pure delight of a super-fast wagging tail … well, you get the picture. But before the intoxicating aroma of puppy breath has confused your mind, there are definitely some things you need to take care of first.

Before you pick up your new pup, follow these simple steps in the infographic below to ready your home and protect your new little one. Because once they’re home, you’re going to want to be spending all of your time playing and sharing adorable “first-time” pics and video online. Also, don’t forget, house training.

Be sure to check out our amazing Healthy Start Packs for Small & Medium-Size Puppies and for Large Breed Puppies. Everything you need to feed and care for your new doggo is included, from food to treats to supplemental nutrients to care products!

With just a bit of prep work, you and your newest family member can get down to the business of bonding and creating adorable memories.

From all of us here at Life’s Abundance, we send our heartfelt wishes for a long, healthy and happy relationship with your new canine companion!

New-Puppy-1New-Puppy-2

Heart Health in Humans & Pets

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When we think of February, Valentine's Day sucks up all the holiday energy in the room. With so much attention paid to the affairs of the heart, it's no accident that February is also Heart Health Awareness Month! And while the human heart plays the star role in these holidays, many of us care just as much (and maybe even more) about the healthiness of our companion animals' heart.

Most people have a basic understanding of the risks of heart disease in humans, but when it comes to canine and feline heart health, these areas remain a tad more mysterious.

In the following FAQs, we’ll look at some of the similarities between humans, dogs and cats, hopefully resulting a better appreciation of these amazing feats of biological engineering.

1. How Widespread is Heart Disease?

Humans: In America, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. Annually, about 610,000 people die of heart disease, accounting for a quarter of all deaths.

Dogs & Cats: Even though reliable statistics are not readily available for adult felines or canines, we do know that heart disease is not nearly as common as in humans. Only about 10% of dogs ever develop valvular heart disease. As with many maladies, risks for heart disease increase with age, especially for dogs over the age of nine (later for some breeds). Tracking heart disease in cats has proven challenging, as felines exhibit very few if any physical symptoms due to this condition.

2. What’s the Most Common Form of Heart Disease?

Humans: In adults, coronary artery disease is the most prevalent kind of heart disease. The main type involves accumulation of arterial plaque, which affects blood flow to the heart. As the layers of plaque thicken and harden, blood flow can be further restricted.

Dogs & Cats: The biggest difference here is that companion animals are not at-risk for coronary artery disease. While that’s good news, keep in mind they can face other medical conditions. For example, dogs can suffer from mitral valve disease or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Mitral valve disease describes a condition where a valve on the left side of the heart fails to close properly. The problem with this is that blood pools into the left atrium, rather than exiting the left ventricle. Older, small breeds are more likely to develop mitral valve disease, a condition that can be aggravated by periodontal disease. DCM weakens the heart muscle so that it pumps less vigorously and regularly, a condition more common in large breeds. Cats, on the other hand, are more likely to experience hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Here, the walls of the heart thicken, resulting in reduced muscle flexibility which decreases the volume of blood pumped. HCM is a genetic disease that is found in both pure and mixed breed cats.

kitten-big-eyes

3. What are the Symptoms of Heart Disease?

Humans: Symptoms vary depending on the disease, but patients with coronary artery disease often have chest pain, arm pain and shallow breathing. As the condition deteriorates, there’s a risk of heart attack.

Dogs & Cats: Dogs typically exhibit signs such as low energy, general discomfort, labored breathing and even a low-pitched, chronic cough. On occasion, they might actually pass out. Cats may also become lethargic, sleeping excessively or hiding for extended periods. It's also not uncommon for cats to lose their appetite. Some may even be at risk of blood clots, which in some cases may lead to pain and possible paralysis.

4. Is Exercise Equally Beneficial?

Humans: Yes, definitely! Exercise lowers the risk of heart attack and reduces stress, another risk factor for heart disease.

Dogs & Cats: The kinds of heart disease commonly found in cats and dogs can't be avoided through exercise. But, as with people, regular exercise will improve overall health and help prevent obesity in pets, which certainly factors on heart health.

boxer-paw-forward

5. One Thing Everyone Can Agree On - Eat Healthy!

It’s hard to overstate the importance of quality food for humans and for companion animals. While significantly more research has been done on the benefits of essential fatty acid supplementation in humans, the science demonstrates similar results for dogs and cats, too.

But how can you be certain that you and your companion animals are getting plenty of omega-3’s and omega-6's? By taking an ultra-refined supplement daily! To ensure you are getting the quality you and your pets deserve, choose an omega supplement that has an IFOS 5-Star Rating. This independent, third-party testing validates that you are getting a safe and effective supplement that you can feel confident giving to any member of your family! If you're in the market for a superior supplement, look no further than Life's Abundance Fish Oil Supplement for people and Ultra-Pure Fish Oil Supplement for dogs and cats!

Take care of your heart and it'll help take care of you!

Dr Jane Bicks  

Dr. Jane Bicks, DVM

Celebrate National Pet Dental Health Month!

toothy-grin-dog

There is a reason why an entire month is dedicated to spreading awareness about the oral hygiene of our dogs and cats: it’s an easily remedied problem with potentially dire consequences. So, every February, we celebrate National Pet Dental Health Month in hopes that we’ll reach pet parents in a way that results in a change. According to the American Veterinary Dental College, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats will need dental care by age three. This is often due to genetics, neglect or poor diet. Sadly, tooth and gum problems in domesticated animals are nothing new. In fact, two Ancient Egyptian fossils of cats showed signs of tooth decay!

Does My Pet Need a Dentist?

According to the American Dental Association, almost 80% of adults brush their teeth daily. And on top of that, it is natural for us to schedule professional cleanings into our annual calendar. Why should the standard be any less for our precious companions?

There are several warning signs of an unhealthy mouth. Some are obvious and others, not so obvious. As a pet parent, it is important to investigate your pet's mouth on a regular basis and check for the following:

  • Breath: When your pup swoops in for a kiss, do you detect a foul odor? Unhealthy-smelling breath is a good indicator of the presence of unfriendly bacteria in your pet's mouth.
  • Teeth: Lift the lip and inspect the teeth. Are they healthy white or are they coated in a brown film? If it's the latter, it means your pet is long overdue for a cleaning.
  • Gums: Color should be medium pink, although some dogs and cats will have black or gray spots on the gums, which is normal for some breeds. If the gums are bright red and angry looking, that could indicate a serious problem.

If you detect any of these warning signs, your companion animal would greatly benefit from a veterinary dental screening. But why wait for warning signs? Why not be more proactive? The combination of routine home checks, regular veterinarian checks and a quality diet could go a long way towards ensuring your pet's lasting dental health.

happiness

Head Shape & Dental Health

Believe it or not, the shape of your pet's head (particularly the size of his or her muzzle) affects tooth alignment. And why is tooth alignment important for dental health? Well, perfectly aligned teeth naturally push food particles away from gums, while poorly aligned teeth can result in plaque buildups, possibly leading to an increased chance of infection.

While poor tooth alignment is typically a genetic issue, a pet's activities can also result in alignment problems. For example, tug-of-war games with towels or ropes played often over the course of years, can move teeth from their normal position. Therefore, you might want to limit such activities.

Try Something New This Month

We're incredibly pleased to announce that starting February 1st, Life’s Abundance will be celebrating National Pet Dental Health Month with exclusive savings on select products.

This is the perfect occasion to try something new and integrate it into your dog’s dental care regimen. Throughout the entire month, Gourmet Dental Treats for Adult Dogs, Buffalo Bully Sticks and Porky Puffs are available at their discounted Autoship prices ... up to 18% savings off retail!

There's never been a better time to provide your dog with yummy, nutritious treats that can actually help to maintain a healthy mouth.

World's Best Dairy-Free Cheesecake

LA-cheesecake

It’s raw. It’s vegan. And it’s impossibly delicious.

Our culinary artist has created a taste sensation that puts other cheesecake recipes to shame! What’s so amazing is that’s it’s dairy-free and packed with nutrients, thanks to our incredibly nourishing Vanilla Plant Protein.

Using muffin tins, makes 36 mini or 12 full-size cheesecakes.

Ingredients

CRUST
•1 cup packed pitted dates*
•1 cup raw walnuts (or almonds)

FILLING
•1 1/4 cups raw cashews, quick-soaked**
•1 large lemon, juiced (scant 1/4 cup)
•3 Tbsp Life’s Abundance Vanilla Plant Protein (about 1/2 scoop)
•1/3 cup coconut oil, melted
•1/2 cup + 2 Tbsp full-fat coconut milk (recommend skimming ‘cream’ layer off)
•1/2 cup liquid sweetener of choice (agave, maple syrup or honey if not vegan)

FLAVOR ADDITIONS optional
•2 Tbsp salted natural peanut butter
•1/4 cup wild blueberries (allow to thaw slightly if frozen)
•3 Tbsp caramel sauce
•Lemon peel, fruit, chocolate or crushed nuts

Directions

1. Add dates to a food processor and pulse several times until only small bits remain and form into a ball. Remove and set aside.
2. Add walnuts to food processor and pulse 5 times to create a meal texture. Add dates to walnut meal and pulse until a loose dough forms. Add more dates if the texture is too dry. If too wet, add more walnut meal.
3. Lightly grease your muffin tin, either standard or mini-size.
4. Scoop in a dollop of crust (about 1 T for standard tin, 1-1.5 tsp. for mini). Press is down using a small glass or the back of a spoon. A shot glass works perfectly for mini tins. If it sticks, cover the glass with parchment. Place in freezer to firm up crusts.
5. Add all filling ingredients to a blender and mix until creamy smooth. Add a bit more liquid (either lemon juice, sweetener or coconut milk) if the mix fails to blend uniformly.
6. Taste and adjust as needed. If you opt to use additional flavoring to the filling, blend in now. Leave aside any toppings for now.
7. Divide filling evenly among the muffin tins. Tap a few times to release air bubbles. Add any toppings, then cover with plastic wrap and freeze until solid, about 4-6 hours.
8. Once set, remove by loosening with a butter knife.
9. Serve frozen or thawed. You can store these cheesecakes in the freezer for up to 1-2 weeks … not that they’ll last that long!

Notes

*Soak in warm water for 10 minutes if they’re not very sticky. Drain well and pat dry before using.
**To quick-soak cashews, pour boiling water over them and allow to soak for 1 hour uncovered. Drain well before using.

Top 5 Not-So-Healthy Trends

questionable-resolutions

Our immediate way of life calls for quick results in almost everything we do. The general rule is “Gimmie a quick and effective hack and I’m there.” Those who lead way too busy lives don’t have time to research the latest and greatest on nutritional science. As a result, the big headlines are often very enticing, but the problem is that a lot of nutritional advice goes to extremes. So before you go all out on that “I really mean it this time, I have to lead a healthier life in 2018” resolution, check out these five not-so-healthy trends. Don’t worry, we’ll make it fast and simple!

#1 Extreme Dieting: It’s time to think of the word ‘diet’ as a noun. It’s something everyone has, not something you do, or can ‘be on.’ Severely limiting calories or following a strict plan consisting of only a few foods or even liquids in the hopes to lose weight is not a sustainable way to work your way to health. While you can lose weight following one of these plans, it often throws people into the bad habits of yo-yo dieting. Depriving your body from the adequate nutritional fuel it needs to run properly can have some pretty negative results like mood swings, lack of energy, brain fog, dull skin, slowed metabolism, constipation and bloating. Yuck! Making small, positive changes to your diet over time can help you lead a healthier lifestyle, and reach your health goals, without going to extremes.

#2 Gluten-Free Eating, Just Because: Over the past several years, “gluten-free” went from a medical recommendation to a health fad to, sometimes, a marketing ploy. The truth is, whether going gluten-free is a good choice for you depends on factors like how your individual body digests gluten and your lifestyle. Celiac disease is a serious autoimmune disorder where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. There’s no doubt that those diagnosed with this disease as well as those with gluten sensitivities and wheat allergies should avoid foods that contain gluten. However, many health care professionals advise against a gluten-free diet unless it’s absolutely necessary because whole grains containing gluten like wheat, rye and barley are linked to reduced risks of diabetes, obesity and other chronic diseases. In other words, for healthy people, they’re healthy, and avoiding them can actually introduce more ingredients into your diet that you should actually be avoiding, like added sugar.

#3 Cutting Out Fats: Let’s finally put to bed the thought that eating fat makes you fat. The days of low-fat or reduced-fat are behind us. Often, the products that have the fat removed have other filler ingredients added, and are often higher in sugar! Fat doesn’t make you fat! Fats are satiating and help you feel more satisfied after a meal, meaning you need less to feel full. Healthy fats like omega-3s also offer so many benefits, like brain and heart health. Whole milk greek yogurt? We’re for it!

#4 Supplement Supersizing: Adding a good nutritional supplement to your diet is a positive move, but more is not necessarily better, especially when it comes to fat soluble vitamins such as vitamins A, D, E and K. Taking excess amounts of these vitamins can potentially lead to overaccumulation, toxicity and other negative side effects. As for water soluble vitamins? Any excess will simply be excreted in your urine. 

#5 All Raw, Vegan Diet: Adding raw fruits and vegetables to your daily diet is a smart move. However, adhering to this strict regimen can be risky because an all raw, vegan diet can often be lacking in important nutrients like vitamin B12, which can cause fatigue, constipation and appetite loss. It also often lacks calcium, an important nutrient for bone health, and vitamin D, a nutrient associated with many health-promoting benefits.

Okay, so this may not be exciting advice, but good common sense is really all that you need to make good choices when it comes to your diet. As we all know, any ‘quick fix’ diet or health trend is not the answer to better health. Focusing on real whole foods that are minimally processed, and incorporating lots of vegetables, fruit, lean proteins (and did we mention vegetables?!) into your diet can help you work your way to better health!

Keri Keri Glassman, MS.RD.CDN

Health Scares & Family Togetherness

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It’s no secret amongst medical professionals that December is one of the toughest months for pet parents. No one really understands why, but both people and pets fall ill this time of year more frequently than at other times, making what should be a happy time of year one of the saddest. In my time working the veterinary ER, I got to see it firsthand, and it was always just heartbreaking.

We had our own scare last month. The week before Christmas, my beloved Golden Retriever became seriously ill. At 8, he’s old enough to be susceptible to a myriad of problems but young enough that despite his whitening muzzle I still think of him as an overgrown puppy with lots of time ahead of him. He collapsed on a Sunday morning. We headed straight to the ER.

Although Brody was stabilized on intensive care and had undergone myriad tests, they were unable to determine the cause of his symptoms and suggested we take him to a cardiologist as soon as possible. In between taking the kids to a holiday play and maintaining some semblance of normalcy, I shuttled him to the specialty center an hour away at midnight, hopeful for some sort of resolution or at least answers.

After three days of hospitalization and test after test, we were still without a diagnosis. Multiple specialists at the top of their fields came up empty. The “cancer” word was suggested multiple times. After all, this is a Golden Retriever we’re talking about. But despite our best efforts, every diagnostic evaluation came up short. We did what you always do when you don’t know what’s going on: treat the symptoms and hope for the best.

I brought Brody home with a pile of medications worthy of your Great Uncle Joe’s medicine cabinet while we regrouped to await test results. Biopsies, ultrasounds, blood tests, all normal. And despite all indications to the contrary, Brody started to slowly improve.

No one was more shocked than me. In all my years of practice, I can’t recall the last time I saw a dog as ill as mine bounce back. It was truly a Christmas miracle, and we couldn’t be more thrilled and grateful. I had fully planned to spend Christmas staring at his empty stocking in a puddle of tears, and here we were instead, cuddled on the couch like nothing had ever happened.

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I’m sharing this with you for a couple of reasons: first, as hard as it is for me to not know what happened, it’s a good reminder to all of us that medicine is an imperfect science. The people on his case are the smartest I know, and the fact that they couldn’t tell me what was wrong isn’t an indication that they were somehow lacking so much as the fact that sometimes there’s just nothing that can be found. I am so incredibly grateful to the medical professionals who spend the holidays away from their families so that we have somewhere to go when our pets are sick. Their care brought him back to me.

Second, this gives me a real impetus to actually follow through on a New Year’s Resolution for once. I always say I’m going to value my relationships more and spend more time with my loved ones, but this time there is an urgency to it that I’ve never had before. I was quite sure I was going to enter into the new year minus one fluffy lovebug, and yet here we are: I still get to wake up to his face on the side of the bed, roll my eyes in a not-really-mad kind of way at the amount of fur he sheds, and wrestle with him for space on the couch at night.

Every day with our loved ones is a gift, and nothing makes you appreciate that more than the prospect of no longer having it. I have no delusions that everything is back to normal; although we could find nothing wrong, something did go wrong with my dog, and it is very likely to come back. But since I have no control over it, for now I will just be grateful for the small things that fill a dog lover’s heart with joy: dog kisses, tail wags, and unabashed joy at something so simple as a short walk. There are no givens for the upcoming days or weeks.

No matter what happens tomorrow, our time together today is a blessing, so let’s make the most of it. From all the pet lovers here at Life’s Abundance (that’s pretty much everyone), wishing you and yours all the best for 2018!

Dr V
Dr. Jessica Vogelsang, DVM

Pack a Go Bag for Your Pet

It’s hard to pick up the news these days and not be worried about the safety of our family. As a California resident, I can tell you … the fire here is pretty terrifying. When a wildfire grows larger than the size of Manhattan, it truly beggars belief.

Whenever I start to worry, I make plans. Plans help us feel more secure in the moment, and should disaster strike, we’ll have the confidence of being prepared.

Most of us will probably never have to deal with anything more extreme than an extended power outage. But, as we see in the news, situations can arise at the drop of a hat that necessitate having to leave home in a hurry.

Few things can put your mind at ease like having a go bag. You’ve probably seen these in films and TV shows. It’s a pre-packed travel bag with a few days’ worth of supplies. You may already have one ready to go … but can you say the same for your companion animal? Here’s a short list of items to pack in case you need to bug out with your dog or cat.

Simply click on the image below to view the full-size PDF and print for later reference. It’s always good to be prepared!

PDF Document
PDF Document

Dr V
Dr. Jessica Vogelsang, DVM

Protein-Infused Crispies

Rice-Crispies

Christmas may have come and gone, but the New Year is on the way. Now's no time to power down! Whip up this incredibly tasty batch of pure goodness that's also oh-so-nourishing! It's all the snacky yumminess of rice crispy treats but with a modern twist, achieved by the delectable additions of peanut butter and our scrumptious Plant Protein. Launch into the New Year with newfound energy from Protein-Infused Crispies!

Ingredients

Coconut oil
4 cups brown or classic rice crisp cereal
½ cup all-natural peanut butter (or other nut butter), partially melted
½ cup brown rice syrup
2 scoops Life’s Abundance Vanilla Plant Protein
1 teaspoon vanilla

Directions

1. Grease a 9-inch by 9-inch pan with coconut oil or line with parchment paper. Set aside.
2. In a medium bowl, mix together melted peanut butter, brown rice syrup, protein powder and vanilla until it forms a dough consistency.
3. Gradually add brown rice crisps to the peanut butter mixture. Use a spatula or your hands to gently fold the rice crisps into the mixture. Then, pour mixture into the pan.
4. Using a spatula, spread mixture out evenly and press into pan so the bars are compact.
5. Place into freezer for at least 30 minutes.
6. Before serving or storing, use a sharp knife to cut your treats into squares. Coat the knife with a thin layer of coconut oil to prevent sticking.

Substitution Tip

Brown rice syrup provides essential stickiness to the recipe’s texture. In a pinch, you can substitute a mix of honey and molasses at a ratio of 3:1.

Blackberry Tapenade

Tapenade

This holiday season, try this sophisticated appetizer on for size! Not only is it sure to please hungry party-goers, it’s chocked full of nourishing goodness, too! What better way to shore up your joyful reserves and fuel your holiday spirits than with this unique recipe from our very own culinary specialist at Life’s Abundance!

As outlined, makes about 8 ounces of tapenade. Simply increase the fixings to serve larger crowds!

Ingredients

1 tsp. capers

1/2 cup kalamata olives, pitted

1/4 cup dried figs

1/4 cup flat leaf parsley

1 garlic clove

1/4 cup kohlrabi

1/4 cup blackberry preserves

1 scoop Life’s Abundance Greens Blend

3 Tbsp. olive oil

1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice

Directions

1. Rinse both the capers and olives and air dry on a towel.

2. In a small bowl combine the blackberry preserves and Greens Blend. Mix well and set aside.

3. Roughly chop dried figs. Wash and dry parsley. Remove parsley leaves from stems. Remove paper skin from garlic clove.

4. Add garlic to the food processor and pulse for three seconds.

5. Prepare kohlrabi by removing ends and peeling. Roughly chop and add kohlrabi to the food processor. Pulse for five seconds.

6. Add capers, olives and figs to the food processor and pulse for five seconds. Add the blackberry preserves mixture to food processor and pulse for five seconds. Add parsley leaves, olive oil and lemon juice to the food processor and pulse for five seconds.

7. Scrape down any tapenade that is on the side of the food processor into the base and pulse until desired consistency.

8. Serve chilled.

Substitution Tip

A number of preserved fruits will work beautifully with this recipe. Try mixed berry, blueberry, currant or apricot preserves.