All posts by dr. sarah

Dr. Sarah’s Tips for Emergency Situations

For most pet parents, the mere prospect of a companion animal becoming sick or injured can be frightening. In the event of an emergency, many pet parents feel powerless to help, not knowing what to do to improve the likelihood of a good outcome. However, you are not powerless to assist, and with minimal preparation and some helpful knowledge, you can help your companion animal successfully navigate an emergency situation. More...

Helpful Tips on Canine Winter Exercise

Is your dog getting ants in his pants? If you are like most dog owners, the plunge of winter temperatures has dampened your enthusiasm for outdoor activity, causing angst for your cooped-up canine. Many animal behavioral specialists reported that dogs that didn’t receive regular exercise during the winter became antsy and reactive in the spring and some developed unwanted behavioral patterns. Additionally, it is not good for a dog’s health to be active in the summer and a couch-potato in the winter. For optimum mental and physical health, many veterinarians recommend that dogs receive 45 minutes to an hour of daily, consistent exercise and enrichment, broken up into shorter intervals.

Even if we want the best for our canine companions, winter presents challenges that make it difficult to keep up a regular exercise routine for our dogs. If you are wondering how to keep your dog active, watch this video. In it, Dr. Sarah gives tips and advice from venturing outside to transforming your indoor space into a canine activity center. Most activities do not require fancy technology or major space overhauls – just some creativity and a sense of fun.

Are you overlooking your dog's weight problem?

Now is a great time to develop better habits for your canine companion. Just like in humans, obesity is rampant in America’s pet population. When dogs carry too much weight they place an extra strain on all their organs, and they can be at an increased risk for diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure and pancreatitis. Unsurprisingly, excess weight gain can interfere with a pet’s quality of life and actually shorten their life span.

Fortunately, dogs respond very well to simple weight-loss programs. By increasing your pet’s exercise and reducing the amount of calories he or she eats, you can help reduce your pet’s weight and the risk of health problems associated with obesity.

But how do you determine whether or not your dog is overweight? And, if your dog is overweight, what can you do about it? In this short video, Dr. Sarah shows you how to learn if your dog is carrying too much weight, and gives advice on how to help your dog shed unwanted pounds.

Make the Holidays Safe and Stress-Free for Your Pet

If you’re like most people, you’re currently in the midst of another incredibly busy holiday season. With planning, traveling, baking, shopping, get-togethers with friends and family, there seems to be no end to the to-do list … or the holiday stress. Unfortunately, during all of the hustle and bustle, we sometimes forget about the needs of our four-legged family members. More...

Eating Number Two is Number One Among Pet Parent Concerns

What is coprophagia? For those of you that have a dog that does it, no explanation is necessary. But for the rest of us…

According to Wikipedia, coprophagia is the consumption of feces, from the Greek κόπρος copros ("feces") and φαγεῖν phagein ("to eat"). Many animal species practice coprophagia as a matter of course; other species do not normally consume feces but may do so under unusual conditions.

Gross!

It is a fact of life: many of us know and love a dog that practices this disgusting gustatory habit, and many dog owners are pulling their hair out trying to get their pet to stop! More...

Tips for Holiday Travel With Your Pet

If you are like many people, your holiday plans will include some form of travel. Increasingly, travelers are opting to include their companion animal on their journeys. According to Road and Travel Magazine, 78% of pet owners are hitting the road and soaring through the skies with their furry friends, and this percentage keeps growing! If you are thinking about taking your companion animal along for the ride, keep in mind that traveling with pets usually involves more than just putting them in the backseat and driving off, especially if you are traveling long distances.

If you are traveling by plane, there are many things to consider, including proper documentation, regulations and services, and a special carrier. If by car, consider booking hotels that accept animals well in advance of your travels. International travel represents a whole new set of challenges, including quarantine periods, a different set of laws and regulations, and special fees and documents.

Unfortunately, some pets become separated from their pet parents during travel – it is important to protect your pet with proper ID. Also, for any kind of traveling, there are certain things you should pack (like food and medication) and other things best left at home. If you aren’t prepared, you may be adding to the stress of the season for both you and your companion animal. The best bet to a safe and hassle-free trip is proper planning and preparation: what you don’t need in the middle of a trip is one more thing to worry about.

In this video, Dr. Sarah details suggested preparations for traveling with your companion animal. From necessary travel documents and how to keep your pet safe, to ideas for easy clean-up so your pet doesn’t wear out their welcome, this video is a must-see for merry holiday travel planning!

How to brush your dog's teeth

While many people like the smell of puppy breath, the same can’t be said for “Dog breath”. It’s almost universally considered as eye-stingingly unpleasant. This phrase has even been used as a play-ground insult! While it’s a joke to some, when you look at the science behind foul panting, it’s clear that bad breath is anything but funny.

In fact, bad breath is epidemic, affecting four out of five companion animals over the age of three. Additionally, this condition could be a sign of dental disease, which can lead to health consequences throughout the whole body, not just in the mouth. As some veterinarians have rightly noted, infections of the gums and teeth can spread to other parts of the body, including the heart, kidneys and intestinal tract … even the joints!

Brushing your dog’s teeth and providing them with dental snacks are two ways to help improve the health of teeth and gums, especially in reducing the build-up of plaque. Unfortunately, however, many pet parents find brushing frustrating, which can result in a stressful experience for pets.

Thankfully, Dr. Sarah is here to share with you the proper technique for brushing your dog’s teeth.

If dental health is a priority for you, watch this short, how-to video about dental care, so you can help your pet fight dental disease and bad breath.