Lifes Abundance content relating to 'healthy foods'

5 Considerations When Choosing Supplements

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There are many wonderful ways to give your health a dietary boost these days, but determining which supplements are best for you can be daunting. The choice for the perfect supplements for your needs really depends upon who you are ... your body’s unique requirements and your personal goals.

If we know anything it's that the internet is rife with unsubstantiated claims and, frankly, bunk recommendations for healthy products that don’t come anywhere near to living up to their hype. Before you start buying nutritional supplements, please carefully consider the following five criteria.

1. Medicinal Intake
Consider your current health and any medicines you’re taking because they might leech your body of necessary vitamins and minerals. For instance, if you regularly take an antibiotic, you might need a probiotic supplement to help keep your gut flora healthy. Or if you’re taking hydroxychloroquine for an autoimmune issue, you’ll need to monitor your folic acid intake. Be sure to talk to your doctor or pharmacist when prescribed a new medication to see if you need to supplement your diet during the course of treatment. Additionally, you would be wise to ask if the supplements you are already taking might be contraindicated by your medications.

2. Prevention Goals
Some of us might be worried about a specific ailment (such as diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol, etc.) and seek a supplement that could possibly aid in prevention. If this is something you’re concerned about, do your research! Learn which supplements contain the nutritional benefits you are seeking and whether or not there’s science to back up any benefit claims. But don’t trust just anyone, make sure your decisions are based on quality information. A good place to start is the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health or consult your doctor.

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3. Age
As we grow older, our bodies require additional levels of certain nutrients to stay healthy. Older women tend to experience bone loss (which can lead to an increased risk of fractures), so adding extra calcium is usually a good idea. Older men might need extra dietary fiber if Type 2 diabetes and heart disease are sources of worry. If you’re older than 50, ask your doctor or you might want to check out the National Institute on Aging for helpful vitamin and mineral recommendations (they have loads of other great nutritional information as well)!

4. Gender
The fact is, men and women have different dietary needs. Women tend to need more iron and calcium, while men are often deficient in, well, quite frankly, just about everything. So taking your sex into consideration could be more important than you think.

5. Current Diet
This is really the baseline for everything. Maybe you are strictly following a ketogenic diet (low-carb, high fat), or you’re a vegan or you eat whatever you please. No matter what foods you consume, you should keep close track of your diet for a week and then analyze it to identify any nutritional gaps. Common deficits include fiber, vitamins D and E, probiotics and fish oils. For example, one person may eat a lot of fish and white rice, but forget to add fibrous fruits and veggies. Another might regularly eat veggies and fruits, but not enough protein. This is a healthy exercise in that, once you see what you might be lacking, you can make a more targeted effort in your meal planning. Furthermore, now that you recognize your dietary deficits, you'll be much better equipped to determine which quality supplements (such as a multivitaminfish oil caps or plant protein) you need to maintain balanced nutritional intake.

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Once you've had time to run through all of these considerations, you will be so much more confident that your next steps will actually be tailored to your needs. When you're ready to shop for nourishing supplements, we hope you'll keep Life's Abundance in mind to help fulfill your nutritional supplement needs!

Chocolate & Berry Protein Smoothie Bowl

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Are you tired of the same old oatmeal? Does reaching for your go-to cereal box feel like a joyless act? Maybe it's time for a breakfast that will not only kickstart your morning with amazing nutrients but also make your taste buds sing!

If you're on Instagram or Pinterest, you know that smoothie bowls are the hip choice for breakfast ... and with good reason! Our culinary team focused all of their combined creative powers to come up with a seriously delicious smoothie bowl recipe. It's easy, it's fast and boy-oh-boy, is it satisfying! It may just be the perfect health snack. Make it for yourself or even, since Valentine's Day is only a week away, surprise your partner with this delectable bowl of velvety yumminess.

It's perfect for vegans and vegetarians who need extra protein in their diet. That's because our Chocolate Plant Protein is 100% plant-based, offering up a clean, nutrient-rich serving of proteins from our unique blend of pea, chia, pumpkin, hemp and quinoa. This premium supplement is gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free and grain-free, too! Just remember to use your favorite non-dairy milk!

Ingredients

  • 3 bananas, frozen
  • 2 scoops Life’s Abundance Chocolate Plant Protein
  • 1/4-1/2 cup milk of choice
  • 3/4 cup frozen berries of choice
  • 1 Tbsp. nut butter of choice
  • 1/8 tsp. vanilla extract
  • Toppings: Shredded coconut, nuts or seeds, cacao nibs, granola, banana slices and fresh berries

Directions

Add all ingredients to a high-speed blender and blend until creamy and smooth. Transfer to a bowl and add your favorite toppings. Serve chilled.

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Be sure to share this fun and simple recipe with friends and family! And if you create your own twist using different toppings, be sure to share your ideas and results in the comments section below!

Yummy Protein Zucchini Muffins

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Nothing's better than a warm, golden muffin fresh from the oven on a cold winter morning. The next time you get a powerful craving for muffins, don't use a cheap grocery store mix. Use your imagination! Our culinary experts tried several combinations of fruits and veggies before discovering a taste sensation that's a guaranteed palate pleaser. We don't mind telling you that this recipe was a serious hit with our co-workers at our home office.

Our bakery-worthy muffins are made from scratch, so you'll rack up some bragging rights for your incredible kitchen skills when you serve these to your friends and family. As it's written below, this recipe yields approximately 6-8 muffins. But you might even consider whipping up a double batch of these irresistible delights.

Be sure to share this inspired recipe with friends and family! And if you do your own twist on this recipe, using different fruits or vegetables, be sure to share your ideas and results in the comments section below!

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup white whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 cup spelt flour
  • 1 scoop Life’s Abundance Vanilla Plant Protein
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp. ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 small zucchini, grated
  • 1 small ripe banana
  • 2 Tbsp. apple sauce, unsweetened
  • 2 Tbsp. light agave nectar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease 6 regular-sized muffin tins. In a large bowl, combine dry ingredients. In medium bowl, mash bananas with a fork. Add remaining ingredients to the bananas and stir.

Add the wet mixture to the dry, stirring until just combined. Pour into muffin tins and bake for 20-25 minutes, rotating pan half way through. 

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Convenient Health Foods For Time-Strapped Eaters

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Most nutritionists encourage people to choose lean protein over fatty meats, and vegetables over french fries. But when it’s 6:45 p.m. and you’re staring down at a solid block of frozen chicken breast that you forgot to thaw overnight, the temptation to order pizza is strong. So strong.

Drive-through and fast-casual restaurants are in heavy rotation in many American homes. The truth is, we cook less than pretty much any other developed nation. But it’s to our own detriment, as a strong correlation exists between cooking at home and better nutrition. Among the main reasons we don’t cook? We just don’t have enough time. Fortunately, there is such a thing as a healthy convenience food! From the humble rotisserie chicken to a bag of mixed vegetables, these time-saving items are also super nutritious.

Rotisserie Chicken

Available at most supermarkets for well under the cost of a large hand-tossed Meat Lover's, these ready-to-serve birds make dinner a snap. Just add a side of vegetables and heart-healthy grains, and you’re good to go. One caveat: Some brands are heavy on salt, so either factor that into your choices for the rest of the day, or find a plain-cooked variety like those sold at higher-end grocery stores.

Frozen Fruits & Vegetables

Yeah, we feel pretty self-satisfied toting a basketful of fresh produce up to the checkout counter, too. But that quickly turns to guilt when we have to toss three-quarters of it in the trash a week later because "life happened." Chopping fruit and vegetables takes time we’d rather spend elsewhere, and the pre-prepped servings you’ll find at the store are often come with a significant markup. We’ve found our salvation a few aisles over, in the freezer section. Washed, cut and ready for action, frozen vegetables are the ultimate time-saver for stir-fry dishes, soups and sides. Or pop half a cup of frozen berries into the fridge overnight for a quick-and-delicious yogurt topper. Lest you worry that this convenience comes with diminished nutrition, know that frozen produce is processed at peak ripeness, and nowadays you can even find organic options in most supermarkets.

Prepackaged Oatmeal

We love a mason jar filled with elaborate overnight-oat concoctions as much as anyone, but when it comes to saving time and energy, there’s nothing like a single-serving packet of the instant stuff. The main advantage of traditional oats is their comparatively low glycemic index score (55 versus 70 for instant, which means they’re less likely to raise blood sugar). Whether you prepare your oatmeal the old-fashioned way with boiling water, or heat it in the microwave, within minutes you’ll have an fiber-, iron- and protein-rich bowl that’s delicious plain or with accoutrements. Just make sure to choose a brand without added sugar and sodium.

Canned Beans

Beans are near the top of many experts’ health-food lists, but by the end of a long day, the only thing we feel like soaking is our own bodies, in a hot bathtub, preferably within grasping distance of some dark chocolate. Good thing canned beans are nutritionally equivalent to dry beans, provided you choose products without added salt or sugar (or at least rinse them thoroughly to remove said salt or sugar). Canned beans make Meatless Mondays a snap. Simply mash them with a fork and spread them on a corn tortilla with melted cheese for a quick and tasty dinner. Simmer a can or two of black beans for 20-30 minutes in some pre-packaged broth along with a bag of frozen vegetables for an easy protein-filled soup. Or combine them with corn, olive oil and cilantro for a yummy side dish!

Canned Fish

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends we eat at least two servings of seafood a week. That might be easily achievable if you live on one of the coasts, but affordable fresh fish is harder to come by in many communities — and potentially labor-intensive to prepare regardless of where you live. Widely available canned tuna and salmon is already cooked and ready to eat or cook straight out of the tin. It’s also often cheaper than fresh while boasting the same high protein content and omega-fatty acid profiles. Mix it with salsa for a zesty sandwich topper or stir in plain Greek yogurt for a nutritious take on tuna or salmon salad. Or, if you’re feeling fancy, whip up a quick batch of five-ingredient salmon croquettes. #Drool.

How do you save time while eating well? Share your tips in the comments section below!

Sources

https://www.livescience.com/13930-americans-cook-obese.html
https://www.health.harvard.edu/nutrition/get-cooking-at-home
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749379714004000
https://www.kcet.org/food/grocery-store-economics-why-are-rotisserie-chickens-so-cheap
https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/05/17/611693137/frozen-food-fan-as-sales-rise-studies-show-frozen-produce-is-as-healthy-as-fresh
https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/glycemic-index-good-versus-bad-carbs#1
https://www.forksoverknives.com/why-should-we-eat-beans/#gs.oZn3KuU
https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/salmon-croquettes-recipe-1952311