All posts tagged 'doption'

Supporting Military Service Members

soldier-dog-companion-service

This week, one of our military veterans received a hero’s farewell. In Muskegon, MI, hundreds gathered to witness the passing of Cena, a black Labrador who retired in 2014 after serving three tours of duty sniffing out explosive devices in Afghanistan. After his recent diagnosis of terminal bone cancer, his caretaker made the decision to end Cena’s life with dignity, and some well-earned fanfare. Cena was one of many military service animals who have saved countless lives for decades.

We reflect with gratitude on the history of those who have served, both human and companion animal, alike. For those of us who don’t serve and are fully entrenched in the civilian way of life, military life can feel like foreign territory. Given that so many have given so much, we’re left to wonder, “What can we do to help?” To that we say, “We’re glad you asked” and we encourage you to open your heart to these following possibilities.

Foster During Deployment: If you answer “no question, my dog/cat” when asked who you’d want with you on a deserted island, fostering an animal for service members deployed overseas may be the role for you. Like anyone, active military service members can and often do have doggos and kitties. They also have the unique hardships of extended out-of-town training, deployments and living far away from a network of family or close friends. Lest these difficulties bar service men and women from being pet parents (or worse, surrendering a pet), there are organizations that exist to “matchmake” service members with volunteer pet boarders. These groups seek private homes and boarding facilities that would care for a military foster pet for as short a period as a couple of weeks, up to one year and everything in between. If you live near a military base, check for a regional service in your area or visit one of the national services like DogsOnDeployment.org.

anxiously-waiting

Adopt a Hero: In an ideal scenario, a retired military working dog (MWD) is to ultimately be adopted by their handler partner, but this is not always possible. If you are a fan of dogs who demonstrate a real drive and purpose, perhaps you have a place in your home for a retired hero! The 2016 National Defense Authorization Act was cause for great celebration because it means that retired military working dogs are now, for the first time, assured of being returned to the U.S. Previously there was tremendous advocacy and expense required on the part of the handler or other caring humans to get these dogs back home. Some adoption organizations currently have waiting lists for MWDs, but this new act could mean an increase in the number of retired working dogs seeking forever homes. To learn more about retired MWD adoption, please check out U.S. War Dogs Association and Mission K9 Rescue.

reach-out-online

Make a Contribution: There are approximately 2,500 U.S. Military Working Dogs currently in service around the world. Consider spending the time to assemble a care package for one, two or even a few of these remarkable canines and their handlers. A little bit of comfort can go a long way towards helping service members endure conflict hardships and feel connected to home. There are also a handful of non-profit groups that facilitate medical care, housing and adoption for retired military dogs – all of which need financial assistance. And let’s not forget our local law enforcement agencies! These groups are often under-funded and under-equipped for their K9 officer programs, relying on grants, private donations and out-of-pocket contributions from their officers. Project Paws Alive works to centralize fundraising efforts for departments actively seeking help. Or simply contact your local fire rescue, sheriff or police department to learn about their specific needs and how you might be able to help.

veteran-and-husky

Become an Advocate: As ‘excess and out-of-service equipment’, Retired MWDs do not receive government funding to support their integration into civilian home life. It’s not uncommon for them to have costly medical needs, or to be without a safe place to heal from the effects of Post Traumatic Stress. Others simply need temporary housing or even just transportation to their new forever home. There are also ‘guardian angel’ volunteers who keep track of MWDs re-apportioned to private contract companies in hopes they may be assured a loving home when their service finally ends.

In light of everything our service members do for us (human and canine), embrace that patriotic spark and let your gratitude inspire action. And be sure to share your own stories in the comments section below!

Read more about Cena here:
www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jul/27/military-dog-cena-jeff-deyoung-michigan

Pick The Right Pup: Infographic

There’s never a bad time of year to welcome a new pup into your home, but with kids now out of school, loads of folks are thinking about adopting or buying a dog right now.

What many don’t realize about picking the right pup, while it’s important to learn about a prospective companion animal, it’s just as vital to know yourself. By thinking about what you want and need in a canine companion, you’ll be better prepared when you try to find that perfect match. To help guide you, we created this handy infographic!

To view the full-size PDF, simply click on the image below. Be sure to print a copy to help inform your big decision!

PDF Document

Foundation Award to Elinore's Dream

Cradling a cat

It gives us immense pleasure to bring you more good news from The Dr. Jane Foundation! Here, we sing the praises of one of our 2016 recipients, Florida-based Elinore’s Dream, Inc. Headquartered in Ft. Pierce, this dedicated animal-welfare group has made significant inroads towards ending the cycle of feline overpopulation in their local South Florida area. More...

Foundation Award to Sanctuary for Senior Dogs

Senior Boxer

It is our great pleasure to tell our readers about one of the latest recipients of financial aid from The Dr. Jane Foundation. This month’s featured award winner is a dedicated group of rescuers committed to improving the lives of abandoned, abused and neglected senior dogs in Ohio.

Founded in 2000, The Sanctuary for Senior Dogs is a non-profit group with a commendable mission … to improve the quality of life of older canines. Unfortunately, the number of people open to adopting older dogs (ages seven and up) pales in comparison to those seeking youthful pups. More...

Foundation Award to Poodle and Pooch Rescue

Tiger

It is our great pleasure to tell our readers about one of the latest recipients of financial aid from The Dr. Jane Foundation. This month’s featured beneficiary is a committed group of rescuers dedicated to improving the lives of abandoned, abused and neglected dogs in Florida.

Founded in 2008, Poodle and Pooch Rescue is a non-profit group with a very specific mission … to rescue as many “leftover” dogs as is possible. Such canines earn the moniker for being too old, too infirm, or possibly both, to attract adopters. Nearly all of their dogs come from local animal control agencies in and around Orlando, where they’ve languished in need of extra-special attention. Once the group identifies such a creature, they set their sights and do not stop until the animal can be taken into their care. More...

Our Foundation Awards Funds To Rescue Group

Sienna

Perhaps nowhere is the spirit of giving more evident than in American small and medium-size animal rescue groups. The majority of these organizations have no consistent sources of income, relying chiefly on fundraising to support their cause.

In the years since our non-profit was founded to give such groups financial assistance, we have witnessed firsthand the dramatic transformations they make possible. Prior to rescue, many of these dogs and cats are homeless, starved, broken and without hope. But thanks to the amazing assistance of animal rescues, the healing process for many of these creatures is nothing short of miraculous. And, as we all know, adopting a homeless dog or cat can yield incredibly positive benefits everyone in the adoptive family. More...

Our Foundation Awards Funds To Rescue Group

Butters

We’re pleased to announce one of the latest recipients of financial aid from The Dr. Jane Foundation. This month’s featured beneficiary is a committed group of rescuers dedicated to improving the lives of abandoned, abused and neglected dogs and cats in New Jersey and surrounding areas.

New Jersey Aid for Animals, Inc., is a no-kill animal protection charity striving to end the suffering of animals through advocacy, fostering and adoption. In continuous operation for over a decade, this committed non-profit group has fought to improve the lives of dogs, cats and other domestic animals in New Jersey. Without state or municipal financial assistance, they rely on individual gifts, community events and private foundation support to cover the costs of day-to-day operations. More...

Our Foundation Awards Funds To Rescue Group

Cocker-Spaniel

It is our great pleasure to tell our readers about one of the latest recipients of financial aid from The Dr. Jane Foundation. This month’s featured beneficiary is a committed group of rescuers dedicated to improving the lives of abandoned, abused and neglected Cocker Spaniels in California.

The Second Chance Cocker Rescue is run by an all-volunteer staff which oversees more than 80 dedicated foster homes that care for their rescues. In continuous operation for over 13 years, this committed non-profit group has fought to improve the lives of Cocker Spaniels across the state of California. Without governmental financial assistance, they rely on fundraisers, adoption fees and the generous donations from their community of Cocker Spaniel aficionados to cover the costs of day-to-day operations. More...

Our Foundation Announces New Round Of Funding

Dog and cat

Charitable work is core to our mission of well-being for all. It’s so important to us that every order placed aids homeless animals.

As the charitable arm of Life’s Abundance, The Dr. Jane Foundation provides financial support to small and medium-size rescue groups who work to prevent animal homelessness, abuse and chronic neglect.

We dedicate a portion of our profits from the sale of Life’s Abundance products into our non-profit’s funding reserves. In the span of several years, we’ve awarded funding to nearly 100 groups! More...

Foundation Award to Forte Animal Rescue

Whiskey

It’s time once again for an update from our non-profit charity, The Dr. Jane Foundation. This month, we’re excited to share news of another financial award to a noble group of rescuers based in Marina del Rey, CA. Founded in 2002, Forte Animal Rescue received their first grant from our non-profit in 2011, so this recent application allowed us to see how this group has flourished over the last four years.

Staffed solely by volunteers, this small non-profit has big aspirations. Not only do they save dogs of all sizes and shapes (and the occasional cat, too), they devote considerable time and energy to improving their community with education initiatives while also working to stem the tide of pet overpopulation. Forte rescuers pride themselves in providing a 100% no-kill safety net for abused, neglected and abandoned canines. More...