Parvovirus

Wednesday, 26 March 2014 12:36 by Dr. Sarah

In this month’s episode of Pet Talk, Dr. Sarah reviews one of those I’ve-heard-mentioned-before-but-don’t-know-very-much-about canine health topics, Parvovirus. Sadly, with spring comes a seasonal increase in this potentially lethal disease, so you and your pup need to be prepared. Our staff veterinarian explains what the disease is, how it’s transmitted, tips about how to hinder its spread, symptoms to look out for, as well as what to do if your dog contracts this illness. And, be sure to watch the entire video, to learn how you can prevent your sweet pup from ever getting parvo. Thanks for watching this installment of Pet Talk, and check back next month for another brand new episode.

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Mouthing Off - A Review of Canine Chews

Tuesday, 25 February 2014 12:42 by Dr. Sarah

If your dog routinely chews for 10-20 minutes or more at a time, you’d better be sure that it’s something safe, as anything this repetitive can have significant wear-and-tear on teeth and gums.

Many pet parents can identify with the zoned-out expression of a dog who’s relishing a good chew experience. The benefits of blissing out on a good chew are many – exercise, mental stimulation, the promotion of dental health … some chew treats are even vehicles for superior nutrition.

In this episode of Pet Talk, Dr. Sarah offers up her reviews of popular chew toys and treats, revealing which ones she does not recommend, and great alternatives. By the end of this episode, you’ll be an expert on the best options available to you, to make sure that chewing time is also safe time for your sweet pup. As a bonus, we’re revealing one of our newest products, an all-natural buffalo chew that can actually help to improve dental health, and it’s on sale! View all of our new buffalo chew treats now!

Be sure to share this helpful episode of Pet Talk with friends and family by clicking on the ‘Email’ link below.

Household Items You Can Use in an Emergency

Tuesday, 30 July 2013 10:06 by Dr. Sarah

It’s an unfortunate fact that our dogs and cats become sick and sustain injuries. And sometimes, getting to a vet quickly isn’t an option. Isn’t it comforting to know that you might be able to help simply by using items found in just about every home? Benefit from Dr. Sarah’s expertise as an emergency veterinary doctor, and watch this month’s episode of Pet Talk. You too can become a ‘Medical MacGyver’! Hopefully, you’ll learn something new that’ll help a companion animal in need until you can get to the vet.

If you’re a regular reader of our blog, you’ll know that we want you to be prepared. Being able to recognize an emergency situation as opposed from something that’ll ‘just pass’, is critical. To make these vital decisions, we offer the following documents: “Tips for Emergency Situations” and “Recognize the Signs of Shock (Requires Immediate Vet Care)”, PDF’s to print for future use. Consider posting each page in a central location, like the refrigerator, for quick reference, should an emergency arise.

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Oral Health

Tuesday, 26 March 2013 14:02 by Dr. Sarah

Does your dog have a chronic case of ‘dog breath’? If so, she’s in good company, as it’s currently estimated that 80% of companion animals over age three suffer from ‘yuck mouth’. That’s right, even the most caring and devoted pet parents have been known to routinely relegate these duties to the ‘I Will Deal with this Tomorrow’ pile.

What many pet parents don’t realize is that dental disease isn’t restricted to the mouth but can indirectly impact the heart, kidneys, intestinal tract and joints. If your companion’s dental hygiene hasn’t been a priority, then you should definitely check out this episode of Pet Talk with Dr. Sarah.

In this short video, our staff veterinarian shares her insights and helpful tips to prepare you and your companion animal for a lifetime of better dental health. Sarah covers all the basics, from what products your furr kid will need to help achieve oral health, why a well-thought-out regimen is necessary for maintaining health throughout the body, how a better approach to dental health can help minimize pain, and much more.

For some excellent pointers on brushing your pet kid’s teeth, we encourage you to watch a
classic episode of Pet Talk.

Take time out to learn just how easy it is to combat bad breath and defeat dental disease. A few minutes now may prove to be one of your best investments towards the long-term health and well-being of your dear companion. Thanks for watching!

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Door Darting

Thursday, 28 February 2013 12:34 by Dr. Sarah

If you have ever tried to leave your house only to have your dog leaping at the opportunity to escape, then you may be wondering how to stop this behavior. You probably know that chasing your pup isn't the best solution ... but what should you do if your companion does sneak out? This common issue is better known as ‘door darting’ and it can make any pet parent feel discouraged, especially if you've got a repeat offender. Unfortunately, if your dog does successfully fly the coop, multiple safety issues can also arise.

The good news is that Dr. Sarah offers effective tips for addressing this problem in this episode of Pet Talk. Her step-by-step guidance will also teach you some commands to use so you can safely keep your companion inside despite any tempting doors being opened.

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Bringing Home New Puppy

Friday, 25 January 2013 11:03 by Dr. Sarah

Few words evoke as much spontaneous glee as ‘my new puppy’. But, it’s also true that some might react with mild dread at the mere thought of the work involved in adopting a new pup. Fortunately, Dr. Sarah is ready to share the fruits of her personal experience and veterinary wisdom, all to help viewers ensure a smooth transition into the wonderful world of puppydom.

In the latest episode of Pet Talk, our puppy-loving doctor is joined by a very special co-host – Sarge. While technically not a sergeant (or even a human), Sarge is qualified to assist in this department, as he is a full-time puppy. With Sarge’s help, Dr. Sarah will reveal how, with just a little bit of prep work, you and your newest family member will be getting down to the business of bonding and creating adorable memories.

From tips on what you’ll need to buy before bringing your puppy home, to how to safely puppy-proof your home, to ideas for communicating effectively with your pup, to dietary considerations and so much more, Sarah and Sarge will demonstrate what you need to know in order to put your best paw forward.

From all of us here at Life’s Abundance, we send our heartfelt wishes for a long, healthy and happy relationship with your new canine companion.

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Trick or Treat

Tuesday, 30 October 2012 14:32 by Dr. Sarah

In this thrilling episode of Pet Talk, Dr. Sarah peers into her crystal ball and treats pet parents to some special tricks to help fur-kids have a happy and healthy Halloween. Our staff veterinarian offers some timely tips on keeping your pets’ paws off potentially hazardous candies. Further, Dr. Sarah conjures up the perfect spell to keep your furry friends from unexpectedly venturing out among the other creatures of the night! And, since tasty treats are central to All Hallow’s Eve, Dr. Sarah reveals some healthier options made especially with your four-footers’ nutritional needs and well-being in mind. In the brief video, you’ll learn all sorts of helpful tricks for taking the fear out of your Halloween celebration!

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Camping with your Canine Companion

Thursday, 26 July 2012 16:49 by Dr. Sarah

Are you looking for an affordable alternative for summer vacation? Do you yearn to explore the Great Outdoors? Are you tired of leaving your dog behind when you leave town? If you answered “yes” to all of these questions, then this episode of Pet Talk was made just for you! In this special summertime message, our intrepid, happy-go-lucky staff veterinarian Dr. Sarah applies her ready-for-anything attitude to a great American pastime with a twist … canine camping. Aided by Alma, her fun-loving, Goldendoodle co-star, our pet expert is on location in the Colorado woodlands, sharing her insights and practical tips to help prepare you for your next nature-land adventure.

As an added bonus to our readers, we’re including a full explanation of what you’ll need to pack to mount your next expedition into the wilds. And be sure to download the handy checklist version to take the last-minute guesswork out of what you’ll need to pack.

From here on out, camping won’t be complete without your canine companion. So, shake the moths out of your tent, dust off your backpack and buy a pack of strike-anywhere matches. Don’t forget to share your camping stories with other Life’s Abundance customers in the comments section below!

Packing List for Camping with your Canine Companion

Identification tags: If your pup is out of the house, she should wear her ID tags (license, vaccination & home address) labeled with your name, city, state and phone number. For your camping trip, consider purchasing an inexpensive, temporary tag for her to wear along with the standard tags. Some stores have engraving kiosks - simply enter the relevant info (such as your dog’s name, the name of the park where you’ll be camping and your assigned campsite number). If your park of choice doesn’t assign numbers ahead of time, or if you’re camping on a wilderness trail, include the phone number of the nearest ranger station. If there’s space enough, include pertinent information about medical conditions (such as ‘Diabetic’) or behavioral issues (like, ‘Cat Aggressive’).

Leash: In addition to your standard leash and collar (make sure they’re in good condition while you’re at it), consider bringing back-ups. It’s a good idea to have one short lead, especially if your destination is heavily wooded - you don’t want Max’s retractable lead wound around a couple of trees when he’s in an excited state.

Tether or Crate: You need to have a way to safely restrain your dog while you are setting up camp, cooking, etc. - just ask anyone who’s ever tried to pitch a tent while holding a leash - not pretty. If your dog routinely sleeps in a crate, and you’re driving to your campsite, bring it along. Obviously, it’s not something you want to carry on your back if you’re hiking to your site. However, a crate is a safe place she can return to while you’re busy prepping or cleaning up your camp site.

Bedding: Bring an all-weather tarp to place under the bedding to shield you and your pup from the ground, especially for camping in cold weather. Laying on the ground risks exposure, as body heat is quickly absorbed into the earth, and we don’t want you or your dog experiencing hypothermia.

Cold Protection: To further protect your pup, especially if she has a short or thin coat, pack a doggie sweater for her to wear. Again, there’s no reason to risk hypothermia.

Booties: Depending on the terrain, presence of ice on the ground, prevalence of fire ants or if your dog has weak footpads (i.e., predisposed to tearing, not uncommon in older dogs), booties are a good solution for paw protection. Don’t forget to do some trial runs with the booties before you leave … wearing shoes for the first time takes some getting used to.

Food and Water: Don’t wing it when it comes to having enough food and water. Do not simply trust the safety of streams, rivers and lakes as a source of hydration, for you or your dog. It’s rare these days to locate natural water that isn’t tainted by giardia, toxic chemicals or other harmful bacteria. If you insist on using water from a natural source, bring giardia tablets (follow the label instructions) and a tiny bottle of bleach (you only need a couple of drops per gallon) to purify the water. When it comes to food, pack two extra days of dog food beyond your planned stay. Preserve the food in a sturdy water-proof container. If your campsite features a “bear box” (a storage container high off the ground, often on a pole), please use it - it’s there for a reason. If you don’t have travel bowls, pack your pup’s regular ones – even these can evoke a measure of comfort in an unfamiliar environment.

Toys: Even though the Great Outdoors may captivate your attention, boredom’s a distinct possibility after your dog has marked his or her territory and sniffed around the camp site a couple of times. If your dog is fearful under the stars, a favorite toy from home might provide a measure of comfort.

First Aid Kit Items: Chances are, you already plan to take some first-aid items … by adding a couple of more products, you’ll be well prepared to handle many canine emergencies, too.
Take the following items and keep them safely stored in clear storage bags … that way, you won’t waste precious time in an emergency situation digging through your backpack.

Bandages: Vetwrap (self-stick gauze), butterfly bandages (used to close open wounds), waterproof surgical tape, duct tape, 4” X 4” gauze pads and non-stick sterile pads
Styptic Powder, to stop bleeding (Kwik Stop is a good brand)
Small Scissors
Tweezers
Hemostats or needle-nose pliers
Small razor (to shave hair from injured area)
Irrigation syringe (to flush eyes and wounds)
Ear and eye ointment (ask your vet or vet tech for which brands for common conditions)
Triple antibiotic ointment with lidocaine (that last part will help with stinging, painful wounds - check with your vet)
Medication for insect stings in both a topical spray and oral capsules (again, talk with your vet about brand choice and dosages)
Hydrogen peroxide (to disinfect the wound)
Towel
Muzzle (if your dog is in pain, you need to take steps to prevent him from biting you or others while addressing the emergency)

If you are planning a camping trip in a remote location, it would be wise to consider enrolling in a back-country EMT course, which should be available through your local community college.

It sounds like a lot of work, but if you’re adequately prepared, you’re more likely to have a blast. Enjoy your trip!

(Please note: Always consult your veterinarian on your first aid kit regarding items, brand choices, dosages and guidance on their uses.)

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Treat Your Pet to Good Health

Wednesday, 25 April 2012 15:43 by Dr. Sarah

Even though we act like it’s true, pets aren’t just like people. Ingesting empty-calorie snacks every once in a while can have a much greater impact on pets than humans, and not in a good way. Even feeding a diet of premium food may not offset the potential damage of ingesting “junk foods”, which often contain unsavory ingredients including artificial flavors and colors. In this particular health equation, it isn’t just a matter of subtraction (or taking away the bad stuff). Thanks to Dr. Jane’s wholesome recipes, you can actually add nutrients to your companion animal’s daily intake. In this episode of Pet Talk, Dr. Sarah reveals how simple it is to make a positive change. If you want to provide your fur kids with the best possible nutritional advantage, you owe it to yourself to watch the latest episode right now. And, please, share this vital message with your friends and family, too!

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Canine Hypothyroidism

Friday, 22 April 2011 10:49 by Dr. Sarah

Hypothyroidism, or low thyroid function, is one of the most common canine hormone imbalances. This was not always the case. In recent decades, hypothyroidism diagnoses are on the rise.

In this episode of Pet Talk, Dr. Sarah gives advice about how best to care for dogs that have already been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, as well as provides the steps you can take to ensure that your dog has the best chance of staying healthy.

After you watch the video, click here for more information on Canine Hypothyroidism by Dr. Sarah.

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